Ireland: October 2019- Part 3

Photo Cong

The peaceful little village of Cong

Day Seven:
We bid our driver, Barry, farewell as he continues north with some of the tour group, while the rest of us head out with a new driver, but not before many hugs and a group photo.

The west coast of the Atlantic is the home of Connemara, our first stop of the day. We’re intrigued by its rough coastline, mountains, lakes, tiny coves and fishing villages. Next, it’s on to the charming little village of Cong, made famous by John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara in the film “The Quiet Man”. Though the film was made there back in 1952, the townsfolk speak of it as if it were yesterday and the small museum, statue and walking tour serve as daily reminders.

We stroll down the road to have a peek over the wall of the Ashford Castle, originally owned by the Guinness family and now a five-star hotel on a golf course, before heading back to Dublin.

As soon as we enter Hotel 7, we know we’ve made a good choice. The historic building, restored into a boutique hotel is elegant and stylish. We’re a bit soggy from the drizzle and eager to check in, but the manager apologizes and asks if he might first check in a group that has arrived at the same time as us. He offers us a complimentary cocktail of our choice, leads us to the bar and we’re immediately soothed by the crème color décor and the Ella Fitzgerald song playing softly in the background.

We dine at The Church, a deconsecrated 18th century church, and are lucky to get a front row seat. The Gothic architecture and large stained glass panels are a lovely back drop for the lively musicians and Irish step dancers. My feet are dancing under the table as I clap in time to the music and once in a while, remember to actually enjoy my meal.

Day Eight
I’ve been waiting to see the bog people this entire trip and am so excited that the day is finally here. We arrive at The National Museum of Archeology (free!) and head right to the “Kingship and Sacrifice” exhibit. The dramatic presentation houses each corpse laid out in its own darkened area. The men were killed and tossed into peat bogs almost four thousand years ago, yet they remain preserved due to the combination of the cold weather and oxygen. It is fascinating to observe the detail; skin, nails on their hands and feet and even their curly hair is still intact. Renowned experts were able to analyze their bodies and piece together details about their individual lives and their civilization.

After a cocktail at The Green Hen and a lively discussion about Dublin with the owner, we take our leave. The Celt Pub is an authentic Irish bar filled with its share of curmudgeons, but it is not here that we will be dining. We are told to walk through it, look for a door, then enter its sister establishment Le Bon Crubeen. The startling difference gives us an even better reception to the lovely brasserie that serves Irish fare with a French twist. We are not shy to try an appetizer portion of crubeen and actually enjoy the pigs feet that are boiled, battered and fried.

Day Nine
What better way to spend a rainy day than at an art museum. The National Gallery of Ireland, (also free) is an impressive building housing a vast collection of European art. We are able to point out places we’ve been by the scenery in the paintings. I am particularly taken with two paintings that share some intimate moments; one of a young man writing a letter and the next of a young woman reading his letter.

Photo Art Museum Dublin

As we enter, the painted staircase stops us in our tracks

“Downton Abbey” has just opened in theaters and we decide it would be a perfect afternoon to take in a movie. We meet two ladies who have arrived with champagne and scones and chat with them about the characters. Spontaneous applause erupts at the movie’s end and we excitedly discuss the movie under our umbrellas all the way down the street.

We’re early for our dinner reservation at Dolce Sicily, but they welcome us in out of the rain. Our table is in an upstairs room that overlooks the street. The Pinot Noir rids us of our chill, as we watch people outside skip over puddles and dodge oncoming umbrellas. We dine slowly, sharing our plates of Fritto Misto, chicken marsala and risotto with wild mushrooms. When we bring an error in our bill to our waiter’s attention, he thanks us with a complimentary Limoncello; just what we need to toast our last night together in Ireland.

What better way to end my Irish adventure than with a limerick:

After visiting bonny Ireland this year
I returned home with a yen for Guinness Beer

Tis the rainy weather they say
That leads you to the pub each day

A lasting souvenir of good cheer

Sláinte!

 

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!

Ireland: September -October 2019- Part 2

Photo Bunratty Castle

Bunratty Castle, home of the Blarney Stone

Day Four: Annascuale
Dingle is a charming fishing village, but in the teaming rain, we can’t seem to see the picturesque spots featured in so many films and we don’t get to hear the locals conversing in their ancient language of Gaelic. Dingle is also famous for the most pubs in Ireland for a town of its size, so we resort to plan B and choose one. A hot bowl of soup and an Irish coffee hits the spot.

Fortunately, the rain subsides and we are able to take in the amazing views around Slea Head. Regarded as the most beautiful peninsula in the world by many photographic magazines, it is also the home of some of Ireland’s famed beaches.

As we head to our overnight destination, the small town of Annascuale, Barry surprises us with an invitation to The Randy Leprechaun for dinner and karaoke, compliments of Paddywagon Tours. Sitting together at long tables, the fun group all get to know each other over cocktails and dinner. Before I know it (and much to my surprise), the usually reserved Mr. Wiz* has us both up and performing Willie Nelson’s “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys!”

Day Five: Killarney
Our day begins with a horse and cart ride through Killarney National Park. It’s great to be able to view the mountains, lakes and waterfalls without getting muddy shoes. An added plus is our comedic driver, who sends us off with a smile on our faces and some new material. We are awed by the spectacular beauty of the Ring of Kerry. Part of the Wild Atlantic Way, the scenic drive around the Iveragh Peninsula boasts rugged coastlines and rural seaside villages and has an almost mystical feel. The Skellig Islands are famous for the filming of Star Wars, its meteorology station and a bit of meteorological humor: it is said that it rains there twice a week; once for three days and once for four.

The charming town of Waterville almost did not host its most famous guest. Back in the 1950s, Charlie Chaplin intended to go fly fishing there on the recommendation of his friend, Walt Disney. Disappointed there was no room at the Butler Arms Hotel, he drove away, only to be chased down by the hotel’s owner, who welcomed him graciously. For years after that, Chaplin and his family would visit yearly and the town’s annual festival still pays tribute to him.

Photo Charlie Chaplin

We settle into our lodging quickly, excited to explore Killarney before heading off for cocktails at The Laurels. We’ve been told not to miss Quinlan’s Seafood Bar and the fresh fish does not disappoint. We’re lucky to get a front row seat at the Danny Man Pub and can’t wait to hear some traditional Irish music. The gentleman who will be performing looks a bit stern as he begins to set up, but as he puts on his cap he almost magically transforms, crooning wonderful ballads and even teaching the audience a few.

Day Six: Galway
To smooch or not to smooch the Blarney Stone? While we originally thought it a bit too touristy, once we arrive at Bunratty Castle, we find the best way to explore this 15th century bastion is to head to its top. While there, we might as well give the old block of limestone a peck and hope for some eloquence to be bestowed on us. You kiss the stone upside down, so hoping that the staff that assists us in leaning back has had a good night’s sleep and that the antibacterial spray bottle used to clean the stone is full, we give it a go. We leave with yet another unique experience under our belts, but still wondering why anyone would purchase the expensive photos taken of you in that awkward position.

Next stop is the Cliffs of Moher. A part of the Wild Atlantic Way, the spectacular sea cliffs rise over 700 feet out of the Atlantic Ocean. We’re able to hike up to the many vistas and take in our surroundings. Our journey then takes us to Galway Bay with fabulous views of the Aran Islands and a chance meeting in a small town with Joe and his mountain goat Puck (named after “A Midsummer’s Night Dream”). We’re captivated by the stories about the hamlet of Lisdoonvarna, with its Fr. Ted Festival (hundreds are dressed as priests after a popular Irish television program) and its Matchmaking Festival that lasts four weeks!

Photo Puck

After a quick hotel check in, we head to downtown Galway. With its cobblestone streets and stone buildings, you can see why The New York Times named it “Ireland’s most charming city.” The bus stops at Eyre Square, a park in the city center, and in front of us regally stands Hotel Meyrick. We stop in for a cocktail and then decide on a change of pace for dinner. We choose Lime, a contemporary Asian restaurant. The service is impeccable, the decor is chic and the food delicious. After dinner, we walk along the river, as we relive another great day and try not to think about how many days it will be before we have to leave.

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ireland: September 2019- Part 1

Photo Temple Bar
Temple Bar

Make no mistake; it rains a lot here and now we understand why the locals tell us “This is  why we drink so much!” There’s only one way to get rid of that damp, bone chilling feeling and it’s spelled P-U-B. Lucky for us all, that is also where many of the wonderful songs and stories that Ireland is famous for, originated. So, thank you, Guinness and Jameson for brewing and distilling us into a constant state of bliss. Rain, schmain; by the end of this trip, I’ll have a spring in my step, regardless of the weather, and will have to stop myself from saying “Top of the morning!” to everyone I pass on the street.

Day 1: Dublin
If Dublin were a shoe, it would be a toe tapping work boot tied with smiley face shoe laces. There’s nothing pretentious about this place; it’s not one of those stunning cities, but there’s a down-to-earth feeling that almost immediately makes you feel welcome. Dublin’s harsh history (think potato famine) prepared its people to be tough, proud and to find the joy in life and celebrate when you can.

We settle into the Maldron Hotel and we’re a bit underwhelmed; coming from Tigerlily in Edinburgh, which rocked our world, it’s a bit plain, but the great location and the young, eager- to-please staff seem to make up for it.

A lively discussion on where to have cocktails immediately follows, but the downpour outside results in a unanimous decision to stay put at the Maldron bar. It seems like a good night for a stick to the ribs dinner, so we head to The Chophouse and dine on sizzling steaks sourced from a local farm and served on wooden boards. If I lived here, I would be a lifetime member of the Beef Club, their foodie group.

Day 2: Dublin
The docent at St. Patrick’s Cathedral delights us with her anecdotes as we tour the imposing Gothic building founded in 1191. The largest church in Ireland, it is also the National Cathedral of the Church of Ireland. This year the church celebrates famous Irish author and one-time Dean of the Cathedral, Jonathan Swift’s 350th birthday.

The drizzle doesn’t dampen our spirits as we walk around the lively Temple Bar area. Even though it’s a tourist area of bars, restaurants and shops and known for being higher priced, it’s still a must see. We follow Big A* across the River Liffey Bridge to Oxmantown, get the last four stools in this small sandwich shop and chow down. This gives the guys a good base for their Jameson Distillery Tour, while JC* and I people watch over a pot of Irish tea at a nearby cafe. We can’t help but stop in to The Brazen Head, the oldest pub in Ireland dating back to 1198 and then stroll the grounds of Trinity College, the top ranked university in Ireland.

Is it five o’ clock already? It’s time for cocktails at The Bank on College Green, renovated back to its Victorian splendor. Having stopped in at each of the contenders earlier in the day, we choose Terra Madre for dinner. Heading down the stairs to a basement, the tiny restaurant that only seats 18 in mis-matched chairs, makes you feel as if you stopped in at an Italian home. With no time for small talk, the owner glides through the tables, stopping only to discuss the menu. We get lost in the descriptions (pasta made in the traditional way as the old ladies did, who lived in the village of Campofilone that overlooks the Adriatic coast), share so we get to taste more of everything and almost fall off our chairs; it’s that good.

Day 3: Waterford
We say goodbye to Big A*, who’s traveling to London to visit friends before going home. Mr. Wiz*, JC and I are heading out on a six day bus tour of Southern Ireland. Even though we have always preferred to plan our own itineraries, having to drive on the “wrong side” of the road convinced us that there’s a first time for everything.

After much research, we settle on Paddywagon Tours. With high ratings, moderate pricing and small groups, we like the fact that they attract a younger demographic. We’re on our own for dinner each night (breakfast is included), leaving us some freedom of choice. While accommodations are simple, staying at bed-and-breakfast inns gives us the chance to get acquainted with the locals.

The jolly group from all over the world starts to assemble and introductions are made; three groups of women celebrating their 40th birthdays, a young man in his late 20s who just moved to Ireland, two recent college graduates with their parents, couples in their 50s and small world; two women from Austin, Texas.

Everyone (especially the birthday girls) likes our driver, Barry, immediately. He is a tall, good looking guy in his late 30s and has a nice way about him, speaking just enough to enlighten us about his country, but also knowing when some quiet time is needed. As we drive out of Dublin, he mentions that the locals call the Obelisk near the River Liffey the “Stiffy on the Liffey.” Having warmed up the crowd, he asks if we know the difference between Scotts and the Irish; Scotts are Irish people that can’t swim and then mentions that he’s half Scottish and half Irish; he likes to drink, but doesn’t like to pay for it.

Photo Glendolough
So much to explore at Glendalough

We drive through the rolling countryside to the Wicklow Mountains and hike around the monastery ruins at Glendalough, Valley of the Two Lakes. It takes us a moment to realize that those are real reindeer just a few feet away and not animatronics. With only 34 of us on the bus, we are able to make quick on/off stops along the way and the first one is Hollywood (population 50). We learn that the iconic Hollywood sign actually originated here, when two brothers bought land in California and named it after their hometown. The medieval city of Kilkenny captivates us with its cobblestone streets and buildings that date back to the 12thcentury. We hang on every word, as our docent regales us with tales of the Butler family, proprietors of Kilkenny Castle.

Finally arriving in Waterford, Ireland’s oldest city, we dine at La Boheme. The husband and wife owners lovingly restored the arched ceilings, pewter bar and original flooring into a French restaurant full of old-world charm. We’re not sure if we preferred the duck breast with ginger and honey sauce or the rack of lamb, but we can agree that Day One on the bus with Barry and our new friends went quite well.

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!