Charleston, South Carolina: A City With Good Taste- November 2022

Photo Charleston Plantation                                                    Boone Hall Plantation

You won’t find any skyscrapers in Charleston. The cobblestone streets, horse drawn carriages and pastel colored antebellum homes are a testament to the city’s rigorous preservation and strict architectural guidelines. 

Humbled by its air of aristocracy and elegance, I couldn’t help but think of the element of human suffering that lurks in the city’s shadows. The city was the key port responsible for the sale and transport of enslaved African Americans to all the major cities in the U.S. Rather than shying away from its history, Charleston strives to tell the real stories of its past by honoring it and educating us. 

Stay

Our Airbnb was just a couple of blocks from King Street; the perfect location. It was a lovely, two story home and each bedroom had its own bathroom. I loved the cozy patio on the second floor and all the amenities the owner so thoughtfully left for us.

Savor

This is one of the few cities I’ve visited where making Open Table reservations one – two weeks ahead didn’t ensure our first restaurant choice. I’m not sure if COVID was to blame or if restaurants are always this crowded, but I suggest planning way ahead – especially if you’re a group, like we were. The six of us like to share entrees, so we experience the menu. Since we were in oyster country, our appetizer was a foregone conclusion.

We were introduced to our first taste of South Carolina’s low country cuisine at Delaney’s Oyster House. Seafood based and served mostly with rice, it’s similar to New Orleans’ creole style cooking. Dining in the historic home, we had a view of the palm trees swaying on the outdoor patio as we feasted on crab and rice, swordfish and fried oysters. By the time we dined at Poogan’s Porch, a restored Victorian home, we were well versed in the cuisine and headed right for the shrimp and grits, scallops and fried chicken.

Never ones to pass up French restaurants, we were not disappointed with the mussels and frites at the cozy Bistronomy. At 39 Rye de Jean, housed in a lovely building circa the 1800s, we enjoyed the scallops, pork chops and lamb shank, and chuckled at the sign above the bar that read “Ooh La La.”

We were impressed when one of the members of the Hyman family stopped by our table to greet us. Hyman’s Seafood, the big, rollicking family owned restaurant has been perfecting itself since 1890. We were greeted with tastes of warm hushpuppies while we waited outside for our table (no reservations are accepted). Brian has been cajoling anyone that walks by into tasting their specialty for years. The combination of the warm, cornmeal based golden fritters and his warm smile and big personality, made it hard to say no. While we waited for our (award winning) she crab soup and fried seafood, served with more hushpuppies, we took turns reading aloud the small cards left on the table. Each with its own positive saying, you are invited to choose your favorite and then turn it in at the gift shop for a free magnet with that same saying. You can guess where we headed right after lunch. At first, we were surprised to see six large, old fashioned working sinks in the middle of the shop, but then realized how clever that was. They were placed there to wash your hands with their famous salt scrub and give it a try before you made a purchase. 

The message on the menu read “Lard Have Mercy!” That set the tone for Sunday Brunch at Big Bad Breakfast. After ordering The Jack Benny (a crispy fried hash cake, two poached eggs, sliced ham, wilted spinach, hollandaise and ham powder), it was hard to choose a side, since it seemed as if most of the menu was already on my plate! My choice of the broiled, sugar coated bruleed grapefruit was a good one. Having raised breakfast to an art form, no reservations are accepted, but if there is a wait, it’ll be worth it. 

This is not your ordinary de-sanctified church turned bar/restaurant. Look up to the ceiling at Church and Union and you’ll notice rows of white cursive writing on the black ceiling. Artist, John Morris was commissioned to paint the inspirational messages from “The Wayward Seaman,” the 2500-year old manuscript that discusses the art of war. Penned by Chinese General, Sun Tzu in the fifth century, it provided motivational guidance and strategic thinking that proved applicable in all situations. One of my favorite quotes was “Move swift as the wind and closely formed as the wood.” Working 12 hours each evening, it took Morris six months to complete all 13 chapters. 

Sightsee

Walking to the wharf via historic King Street, it was refreshing to see local and regional shops outnumber national chains. Eclectic, yet exuding sophistication, we were taken with the area’s vibe. Across from waterfront park, you couldn’t help but stop in front of each mansion along the street to relish its splendor and wonder about its past.

When in Charleston, a plantation tour is a must! Named the No. 1 plantation in Charleston by USA Today, we chose Boone Hall Plantation, not the closest, but well worth the Uber ride. Built in 1681 by Englishman Major John Boone, the 738-acre estate is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is still a working farm.

Our tickets included an entire day of events and tours. Boone Hall is the only Charleston plantation to present a distinctive presentation titled “The Gullah Culture,” in which descendants of the Gullah people present the history of their slave culture through stories, song and dance. A tour of the mansion built in 1936 provided us with some background into the life of a plantation owner. A 40-minute tour of the grounds on a motorized tractor helped us appreciate the vastness of the property and its farm. The self-guided tour of the nine original slave cabins dating back to 1790 – 1810, were an emotional glimpse into the aspects of daily life.  

Still eager to discover more about this amazing city, we booked a walking tour through Walks of Charleston. Not only did our tour guide, Amy Tankersley, have a wonderful sense of humor, she had a way of making every detail interesting. Who else would take it upon themselves to actually construct a diorama in order to explain the original city’s walls?! I particularly loved the alleys we visited; narrow public streets that widened to all of a sudden surprise you with glances of interesting homes and beautiful gardens. We would never have found these hidden gems on our own or gained so much insight into Charleston. 

In only a few short days, Charleston had succeeded in winning us over us with its southern charm, reminding us “Y’all come back now, ya hear?”

Photo Charleston Alley

                                            Another “secret” public street

Something Old, Something New Mexico- October 2021

Photo Santa Fe 1

Albuquerque

New Mexico’s largest city, Albuquerque, spreads itself out in two distinct areas: a modern downtown and the historic Old Town, made up of adobe buildings dating back to 1706. 

Old Town is where we wanted to be, so we chose the Hotel Albuquerque, just a short walk away. The hotel lobby, with its tile floors, white adobe walls, rustic chandeliers and tooled leather furniture made up for the plainly decorated rooms. 

Shops and galleries specializing in Native America lined Old Town’s Plaza. Winding paths, placitas (small plazas) and gardens softened the tourist feel. The Sawmill Market, the 25.000 square foot artisanal food hall/market sits alongside lofts, artist studios and retail space in the Historic Sawmill District.

Dinner at El Patio was worth the drive. The old hacienda with its lush gardens and famous tree lined patio is home to their famous sopaipillas (English translation- sofa pillows); deep fried pastry eaten with honey as a bread. Serving Northern New Mexican food for the last 40 years, the large dining room at Tomasita’s had a loud, cheerful vibe and was the perfect place to share some of its lunch specialties.

The highlight of our Albuquerque visit was our stay at the Hotel Parq Central on our return to Albuquerque the last night of our trip. Though not as centrally located as the Hotel Albuquerque, the hotel provides shuttle service to the airport and within a three-mile radius of the hotel.

Listed on the National Historic Register, the hotel was once the home of the hospital for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad employees. Painstakingly renovated back to its 1926 splendor, every space exuded art deco elegance. I made it a point to luxuriate on a chaise lounge in the sun filled conservatory after our gourmet continental breakfast (included). We toasted to our last day in New Mexico while rocking in custom made rockers in the lovely manicured garden with a central fountain. Having visited their rooftop bar, The Apothecary, for a daytime view of the mountains, we just had to have a nightcap and a glimpse of the city view.

Santa Fe

Nestled in the rugged foothills of the Sangre Christo Mountains, travelers have long been  attracted to Santa Fe for its mystical energy and health focus. Not sure I completely understood, I was told by friends to “allow the environment to introduce itself by exploring its space.”

Explore we did and I began to recognize and appreciate the peaceful vibe. Even though the streets were crowded, there was this ever-present feeling of tranquility. Everyone seemed laid back and there no loud sounds trying to grab your attention.

Since a few of us were traveling together, an Airbnb was the perfect choice. It’s fun to breakfast and cocktail together each day, while still having your own space. A bottle of wine was there to greet us when we entered Casa Nona’s Two Casitas and we were immediately charmed by the Southwestern style furniture, heated floors and Kiva fireplace. 

Thanks to the audio tour, included in the ticket price (don’t forget your earbuds!), the Georgia O’Keefe Museum came alive and helped us to understand this iconic modernist artist. This quote of hers seemed to sum it all up – “I found I could say things with flowers and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way…things I had no words for.”

A visit to Meow Wolf’s House of Eternal Return was a must. Described as “a mind bending, interactive, immersive, explorable art experience,” it’s 70 rooms featured hands on art. Picture 100 artists given carte blanche to create their innermost psychedelic dreams in a cavernous space. As we entered through, what looked like a home, we quickly realized the only way to continue was either opening the refrigerator and walking through it or opening the clothes dryer door and sliding down it. Part jungle gym, part haunted house and part children’s museum, we all were enthralled with the level of creativity and downright outlandishness and realized the best way back to reality was via their bar. While the adventurous one in our group opted for a neon colored cocktail topped with cotton candy, the rest of us were content with a cold beer. 

Photo Santa Fe 2

We all agreed that dinner at Luminaria at the Inn and Spa at Loretta stood out as outstanding. We’re not sure what impressed us most: the adobe architecture, the famed Angus beef filet, the Heritage Duroc pork, or the purple potatoes. 

At $1300 per night, The Bishops Lodge is a soulful retreat on 317 secluded acres that border the Santa Fe National Forest and is the winner of the National Geographic Legacy Award. We brunched at their restaurant, Skyfire, which allowed us to tour the grounds, get a feel for the pueblo style resort/ranch’s ambiance and have a taste of their excellent roasted shrimp and grits with smoked pork belly.

On the other end of the spectrum, when we read that Dolina Bakery & Cafe, a small rather non-descript looking restaurant serving Eastern European food, was named one of the top restaurants, we had no choice but to give it a try. The chicken and waffles left us wondering how we could fit in another visit before we even left. 

Shopping the historic Santa Fe Plaza, we stopped in every shop and gallery until we each found just the right souvenir to bring home as a reminder of this very special city. 

Taos

Though a few extra miles drive, we chose to take the High Road, the 56-mile scenic winding road through the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Passing desert, mountains, forests and tiny pueblos, our first stop was El Santuario in Chimayo. Known as the “Lourdes of America,” three hundred thousand people make the pilgrimage here each year to dig up some of the sacred dirt, which, much like the water at Lourdes, is said to grant miracles. 

The Greater World Earthship Biotecture Community peaked our curiosity and we had to see it for ourselves. Back in the 1970s, architect Mike Reynolds purchased a sprawling 600-acre mesa and began creating homes that were entirely off the grid. Utilizing solar and wind power, these “earthships” were intentionally constructed out of recycled, reused and reclaimed materials. Rather than appearing to be space or hippy like dwellings, the homes had a surprisingly stylish look to them and a video of their interiors was rather impressive. Our only regret was that we realized too late we could have booked an overnight stay in one; next time!

Rather than book one of the resorts that offer a body-mind-spirit experience, due to our short visit, we opted to stay in town at the Hotel Don Fernando de Taos. Once again, a charming Southwest lobby gave way to non-descript rooms.

In the lovely little plaza and historic district, we chatted with an artist and purchased one of her watercolors of Chimayo. At the historic Taos Inn, we enjoyed Happy Hour and live music at Doc Martens, AKA “Taos’ living room,” and wondered why we hadn’t arrived in New Mexico sooner.

Photo Santa Fe 3

Arkansas: The End

Photo Arkansas The End

Tourists enjoyed seeing  my employee and I dressed in “old timey” outfits

I didn’t let the rain deter me. Hoping tourists might consider this weather a good shopping day, I happily straightened up the displays in the store, put on the background music and unlocked the door. A young couple, dressed in jeans and T-shirts, came in almost immediately and took a keen interest in the Granny Chicken paintings. We chatted for a while and they said they’d be back later.

When they returned, they asked what kind of deal they could get if they bought all of her paintings. It added up to thousands of dollars (primitive art does not come cheap), so to show some goodwill (and because Granny Chicken had made most of the frames), I gave them a framing discount. A year later, we visited them in Carmel, California, and were awestruck as to how beautiful her art looked, professionally framed in their all white home and art gallery. (with even higher price tags on them).

Mr. Wiz* and I discovered some local, handmade iron products, tracked down the owner and set up a meeting. We negotiated to carry their product line on consignment and Mr. Wiz struck up a friendship with the owner. They started discussing him joining the company and soon after, Mr. Wiz became a partner. The joke around town was that he was the only partner that actually owned a suit. This came in handy when Mr. Wiz successfully secured the company’s first bank line of credit.

This was a real American success story. Stone County Ironworks was a one-man operation started in an old gas station. David, the owner and a self-proclaimed hippy (if you ever wondered where all the hippies went, it was Arkansas) slowly grew the company and was able to hire more blacksmiths. This was tough work and his staff looked like a group of Hells Angels, though they were the sweetest guys. In time, the company became the largest production blacksmith company in the United States and was listed in the Inc. 500, a listing of the top 500 fastest growing U.S. companies.

If all of this wasn’t exciting enough, after five years of married life and wondering if we’d ever become parents, I became pregnant. For this reason, Arkansas will always have a special place in my heart. Weighing in at 10 pounds, 1 ½ ounces, I found out later that if Big A* had been born in Baylor University Hospital, he would have received a full football scholarship.

I had a big decision to make. I loved Mountain View Mercantile, but realized that working 10 – 12 hours a day and motherhood did not mix. We wound up selling the building and the store to Stone County Ironworks and I began working for them part-time in public relations and marketing. My first assignment was to interview the owner, David, in order to enter him in the Arkansas Small Business Person of the Year contest. Very shy and close mouthed, it wasn’t easy to get him to open up, but in the end, he shared just enough so that his story won him the honor. Soon, he’d be off to Washington, D.C. and return home with the second runner-up national award.

With products too heavy for shipping, the Ironworks had a fleet of trucks to travel to trade shows. The blacksmiths welded a special seat up front for Big A’s car seat and off we’d go together, traveling across the United States. Mr. Wiz laughs now to think how he would set up the trade show booths with Big A on his back in a baby carrier.

It was when Big A turned two that we started thinking of the future. The Arkansas schools were rated No. 48 and though we got our fill of traveling and dining out on the road, there would probably come a time when we’d have to settle down. Mountain View had no restaurants to speak of, even the little movie theater closed up in the winter and Little Rock was two hours away.

After many family meetings, we decided to head back to a city, but rather than let a job lead us, Mr. Wiz suggested we chose the city first and then he’d find a job there. We settled on Chicago and as luck would have it, his first phone call to an old friend landed Mr. Wiz a position helping him run his new company.

Though that was so many years ago, I never forgot that little town and still keep in touch with some of the people there. It was small enough so that I wasn’t intimidated to follow my dreams, large enough to show me how important living in a close-knit community was and just quirky enough to make for some great memories.

 

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
If you enjoyed this post, please scroll down, like it and feel free to share it!

 

 

 

 

 

Arkansas: The Middle

Photo Arkansas Middle 1A

Our store, Mountain View Mercantile (originally he O.R. Case Building) by Granny Chicken

The old pickup truck stopped to let me cross the street. The two passengers smiled and waved to me. Though I had never met these two men, I returned the wave and the smile, as I heard the driver yell out his window “Hey, Linda- If you need anything while your hubby is out of town next week, you just holler at us.” Feeling as if I was living on the movie set of Mayberry, along with Andy, Opie and Aunt Bee, I had officially settled into small town living.

I can honestly say that I never once was afraid to stay in that large building all by myself. Even on dark, rainy nights, I felt as if someone had their arms around me. Granny Chicken said that was probably Mr. O.R. Case, the building’s owner, who was glad it was being looked after.

Named by her grandson since she was the grandma with the chickens, Granny Chicken was a local artist who painted in the primitive style. A bit eccentric and dressed in her signature print dress and straw hat, she wandered into the store one afternoon. Having just read about her in a tourism publication, we struck up a conversation and made a date to meet for lunch. Soon after, I took a crash course in primitive art, started carrying her art on consignment in the store and became her agent.

Together, we traveled to events sponsored by the Department of Parks and Tourism to promote the Ozarks and Mountain View. Granny turned out to be more connected than I had imagined. She introduced me to then Governor Clinton and his family at the Governor’s mansion. At Winrock Farms, the Rockefeller estate, we clapped along as Winthrop Rockefeller sat on a bale of hay and played the spoons, but not before he had welcomed her personally. I remember thinking that the folks back home will never believe this.

It seemed that whatever I needed would just appear. Pouring over old books in the local library, I found just the right logo for the store. Hoping to find some original recordings back from the building’s era, I was surprised to find a collector of vintage music sitting against the building playing just such music and happy to sell me some tapes. Complete with that authentic tinny sound, it made for wonderful background music in the store. I was surprised when, out of the blue, a packaging salesman walked into the store asking if I needed any supplies. Keeping with the theme and my budget, I stamped my logo on brown bags and used bright colored tissue paper and rope as gift wrap.

Between the local cast of characters dropping in (my favorite was the local baker, a New York transplant, who resembled Woody Allen) and the tourists visiting, every day was an adventure. Students from the Soviet Union and China, soil and conservation experts from Morocco, Africa and South America and groups of senior RVers; you never knew what to expect.

Living in a tourist town did have its benefits. Visitors were upbeat, the small community supported each other and, together, worked hard to put their best foot forward. Somewhere between the advice of the other store owners (open when you want, close when you’ve had enough) and my methodical personality, I found my rhythm and enjoyed the ride.

Photo Arkansas Middle 2

Author’s Note:
If you enjoyed this post, please scroll down, like it and feel free to share it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkansas: The Beginning

Photo Arkansas Beginning

Mountain View, Arkansas, (population: two thousand one hundred forty seven) was not on the way to anywhere else. You must travel into the winding mountains of the Ozarks to get there. The small town with its historic buildings, built of Arkansas stone and clustered around the Courthouse Square appeared to be frozen in time. Yet, there was a pulse and vitality you could feel.

Most every day, you’d hear music; mandolins, fiddles, dulcimers, guitars. It’s a long-standing tradition that musicians gathered anytime, day or night, and played together on the square. Known as the “Folk Music Capital of the World,” Mountain View was home to musical events such as the National Fiddler’s Competition.

My eyes shut tightly, Mr. Wiz* excitedly escorted me out of the car. I opened my eyes to find him standing in front of a large decrepit stone building, as he explained that the almost eight thousand square feet was once home to a car dealership. Since the wood furniture company Mr. Wiz was running was renting it as a warehouse, he wondered what I would think of trying a little experiment.

What if we cleaned up the first floor and displayed some of the wood products to sell during the upcoming festival? Based on the sales, we might consider buying the building and creating a retail store. What the heck; we had already moved there from Chicago and back then, we were ready for an adventure.

We got right to work, scraping off the black paint that covered the front picture windows and sweeping up the dirt and dust. Just as I was worrying what we might do to hide the large holes in the walls, a shy woman peeked in to say that she was looking for a place to display her handmade quilts during the festival. We made a deal, strung them up on clotheslines, put together some samples of the outdoor furniture (porch swings, Adirondack chairs, etc.) and were open for business.

The three-day Bean Festival brought over fifty thousand visitors to the little town to enjoy the famous outhouse parade, to taste the beans simmering in the big black cauldrons over an open fire in order to judge the best recipe and to play music on the courthouse square. Our cash and carry experiment was an overwhelming success and soon after, we became the proud owners of the O.R. Case building.

Built in 1928, we were excited to return this National Historic Register building to its original glory days. Even the old dust and dirt that stuck to our clothes, as we did some prep work before the construction crew started, couldn’t dampen our spirits.

It is said that because Arkansas rests on diamond mines there is a mystical aura around it. This not only explained the quilter showing up at just at the right time, but also a continuing series of events that to this day, still has me scratching my head in disbelief.

To be continued…

 

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
If you enjoyed this post, please scroll down, like it and feel free to share it!

 

Ireland: October 2019- Part 3

Photo Cong

The peaceful little village of Cong

Day Seven:
We bid our driver, Barry, farewell as he continues north with some of the tour group, while the rest of us head out with a new driver, but not before many hugs and a group photo.

The west coast of the Atlantic is the home of Connemara, our first stop of the day. We’re intrigued by its rough coastline, mountains, lakes, tiny coves and fishing villages. Next, it’s on to the charming little village of Cong, made famous by John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara in the film “The Quiet Man”. Though the film was made there back in 1952, the townsfolk speak of it as if it were yesterday and the small museum, statue and walking tour serve as daily reminders.

We stroll down the road to have a peek over the wall of the Ashford Castle, originally owned by the Guinness family and now a five-star hotel on a golf course, before heading back to Dublin.

As soon as we enter Hotel 7, we know we’ve made a good choice. The historic building, restored into a boutique hotel is elegant and stylish. We’re a bit soggy from the drizzle and eager to check in, but the manager apologizes and asks if he might first check in a group that has arrived at the same time as us. He offers us a complimentary cocktail of our choice, leads us to the bar and we’re immediately soothed by the crème color décor and the Ella Fitzgerald song playing softly in the background.

We dine at The Church, a deconsecrated 18th century church, and are lucky to get a front row seat. The Gothic architecture and large stained glass panels are a lovely back drop for the lively musicians and Irish step dancers. My feet are dancing under the table as I clap in time to the music and once in a while, remember to actually enjoy my meal.

Day Eight
I’ve been waiting to see the bog people this entire trip and am so excited that the day is finally here. We arrive at The National Museum of Archeology (free!) and head right to the “Kingship and Sacrifice” exhibit. The dramatic presentation houses each corpse laid out in its own darkened area. The men were killed and tossed into peat bogs almost four thousand years ago, yet they remain preserved due to the combination of the cold weather and oxygen. It is fascinating to observe the detail; skin, nails on their hands and feet and even their curly hair is still intact. Renowned experts were able to analyze their bodies and piece together details about their individual lives and their civilization.

After a cocktail at The Green Hen and a lively discussion about Dublin with the owner, we take our leave. The Celt Pub is an authentic Irish bar filled with its share of curmudgeons, but it is not here that we will be dining. We are told to walk through it, look for a door, then enter its sister establishment Le Bon Crubeen. The startling difference gives us an even better reception to the lovely brasserie that serves Irish fare with a French twist. We are not shy to try an appetizer portion of crubeen and actually enjoy the pigs feet that are boiled, battered and fried.

Day Nine
What better way to spend a rainy day than at an art museum. The National Gallery of Ireland, (also free) is an impressive building housing a vast collection of European art. We are able to point out places we’ve been by the scenery in the paintings. I am particularly taken with two paintings that share some intimate moments; one of a young man writing a letter and the next of a young woman reading his letter.

Photo Art Museum Dublin

As we enter, the painted staircase stops us in our tracks

“Downton Abbey” has just opened in theaters and we decide it would be a perfect afternoon to take in a movie. We meet two ladies who have arrived with champagne and scones and chat with them about the characters. Spontaneous applause erupts at the movie’s end and we excitedly discuss the movie under our umbrellas all the way down the street.

We’re early for our dinner reservation at Dolce Sicily, but they welcome us in out of the rain. Our table is in an upstairs room that overlooks the street. The Pinot Noir rids us of our chill, as we watch people outside skip over puddles and dodge oncoming umbrellas. We dine slowly, sharing our plates of Fritto Misto, chicken marsala and risotto with wild mushrooms. When we bring an error in our bill to our waiter’s attention, he thanks us with a complimentary Limoncello; just what we need to toast our last night together in Ireland.

What better way to end my Irish adventure than with a limerick:

After visiting bonny Ireland this year
I returned home with a yen for Guinness Beer

Tis the rainy weather they say
That leads you to the pub each day

A lasting souvenir of good cheer

Sláinte!

 

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!

Ireland: September -October 2019- Part 2

Photo Bunratty Castle

Bunratty Castle, home of the Blarney Stone

Day Four: Annascuale
Dingle is a charming fishing village, but in the teaming rain, we can’t seem to see the picturesque spots featured in so many films and we don’t get to hear the locals conversing in their ancient language of Gaelic. Dingle is also famous for the most pubs in Ireland for a town of its size, so we resort to plan B and choose one. A hot bowl of soup and an Irish coffee hits the spot.

Fortunately, the rain subsides and we are able to take in the amazing views around Slea Head. Regarded as the most beautiful peninsula in the world by many photographic magazines, it is also the home of some of Ireland’s famed beaches.

As we head to our overnight destination, the small town of Annascuale, Barry surprises us with an invitation to The Randy Leprechaun for dinner and karaoke, compliments of Paddywagon Tours. Sitting together at long tables, the fun group all get to know each other over cocktails and dinner. Before I know it (and much to my surprise), the usually reserved Mr. Wiz* has us both up and performing Willie Nelson’s “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys!”

Day Five: Killarney
Our day begins with a horse and cart ride through Killarney National Park. It’s great to be able to view the mountains, lakes and waterfalls without getting muddy shoes. An added plus is our comedic driver, who sends us off with a smile on our faces and some new material. We are awed by the spectacular beauty of the Ring of Kerry. Part of the Wild Atlantic Way, the scenic drive around the Iveragh Peninsula boasts rugged coastlines and rural seaside villages and has an almost mystical feel. The Skellig Islands are famous for the filming of Star Wars, its meteorology station and a bit of meteorological humor: it is said that it rains there twice a week; once for three days and once for four.

The charming town of Waterville almost did not host its most famous guest. Back in the 1950s, Charlie Chaplin intended to go fly fishing there on the recommendation of his friend, Walt Disney. Disappointed there was no room at the Butler Arms Hotel, he drove away, only to be chased down by the hotel’s owner, who welcomed him graciously. For years after that, Chaplin and his family would visit yearly and the town’s annual festival still pays tribute to him.

Photo Charlie Chaplin

We settle into our lodging quickly, excited to explore Killarney before heading off for cocktails at The Laurels. We’ve been told not to miss Quinlan’s Seafood Bar and the fresh fish does not disappoint. We’re lucky to get a front row seat at the Danny Man Pub and can’t wait to hear some traditional Irish music. The gentleman who will be performing looks a bit stern as he begins to set up, but as he puts on his cap he almost magically transforms, crooning wonderful ballads and even teaching the audience a few.

Day Six: Galway
To smooch or not to smooch the Blarney Stone? While we originally thought it a bit too touristy, once we arrive at Bunratty Castle, we find the best way to explore this 15th century bastion is to head to its top. While there, we might as well give the old block of limestone a peck and hope for some eloquence to be bestowed on us. You kiss the stone upside down, so hoping that the staff that assists us in leaning back has had a good night’s sleep and that the antibacterial spray bottle used to clean the stone is full, we give it a go. We leave with yet another unique experience under our belts, but still wondering why anyone would purchase the expensive photos taken of you in that awkward position.

Next stop is the Cliffs of Moher. A part of the Wild Atlantic Way, the spectacular sea cliffs rise over 700 feet out of the Atlantic Ocean. We’re able to hike up to the many vistas and take in our surroundings. Our journey then takes us to Galway Bay with fabulous views of the Aran Islands and a chance meeting in a small town with Joe and his mountain goat Puck (named after “A Midsummer’s Night Dream”). We’re captivated by the stories about the hamlet of Lisdoonvarna, with its Fr. Ted Festival (hundreds are dressed as priests after a popular Irish television program) and its Matchmaking Festival that lasts four weeks!

Photo Puck

After a quick hotel check in, we head to downtown Galway. With its cobblestone streets and stone buildings, you can see why The New York Times named it “Ireland’s most charming city.” The bus stops at Eyre Square, a park in the city center, and in front of us regally stands Hotel Meyrick. We stop in for a cocktail and then decide on a change of pace for dinner. We choose Lime, a contemporary Asian restaurant. The service is impeccable, the decor is chic and the food delicious. After dinner, we walk along the river, as we relive another great day and try not to think about how many days it will be before we have to leave.

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ireland: September 2019- Part 1

Photo Temple Bar
Temple Bar

Make no mistake; it rains a lot here and now we understand why the locals tell us “This is  why we drink so much!” There’s only one way to get rid of that damp, bone chilling feeling and it’s spelled P-U-B. Lucky for us all, that is also where many of the wonderful songs and stories that Ireland is famous for, originated. So, thank you, Guinness and Jameson for brewing and distilling us into a constant state of bliss. Rain, schmain; by the end of this trip, I’ll have a spring in my step, regardless of the weather, and will have to stop myself from saying “Top of the morning!” to everyone I pass on the street.

Day 1: Dublin
If Dublin were a shoe, it would be a toe tapping work boot tied with smiley face shoe laces. There’s nothing pretentious about this place; it’s not one of those stunning cities, but there’s a down-to-earth feeling that almost immediately makes you feel welcome. Dublin’s harsh history (think potato famine) prepared its people to be tough, proud and to find the joy in life and celebrate when you can.

We settle into the Maldron Hotel and we’re a bit underwhelmed; coming from Tigerlily in Edinburgh, which rocked our world, it’s a bit plain, but the great location and the young, eager- to-please staff seem to make up for it.

A lively discussion on where to have cocktails immediately follows, but the downpour outside results in a unanimous decision to stay put at the Maldron bar. It seems like a good night for a stick to the ribs dinner, so we head to The Chophouse and dine on sizzling steaks sourced from a local farm and served on wooden boards. If I lived here, I would be a lifetime member of the Beef Club, their foodie group.

Day 2: Dublin
The docent at St. Patrick’s Cathedral delights us with her anecdotes as we tour the imposing Gothic building founded in 1191. The largest church in Ireland, it is also the National Cathedral of the Church of Ireland. This year the church celebrates famous Irish author and one-time Dean of the Cathedral, Jonathan Swift’s 350th birthday.

The drizzle doesn’t dampen our spirits as we walk around the lively Temple Bar area. Even though it’s a tourist area of bars, restaurants and shops and known for being higher priced, it’s still a must see. We follow Big A* across the River Liffey Bridge to Oxmantown, get the last four stools in this small sandwich shop and chow down. This gives the guys a good base for their Jameson Distillery Tour, while JC* and I people watch over a pot of Irish tea at a nearby cafe. We can’t help but stop in to The Brazen Head, the oldest pub in Ireland dating back to 1198 and then stroll the grounds of Trinity College, the top ranked university in Ireland.

Is it five o’ clock already? It’s time for cocktails at The Bank on College Green, renovated back to its Victorian splendor. Having stopped in at each of the contenders earlier in the day, we choose Terra Madre for dinner. Heading down the stairs to a basement, the tiny restaurant that only seats 18 in mis-matched chairs, makes you feel as if you stopped in at an Italian home. With no time for small talk, the owner glides through the tables, stopping only to discuss the menu. We get lost in the descriptions (pasta made in the traditional way as the old ladies did, who lived in the village of Campofilone that overlooks the Adriatic coast), share so we get to taste more of everything and almost fall off our chairs; it’s that good.

Day 3: Waterford
We say goodbye to Big A*, who’s traveling to London to visit friends before going home. Mr. Wiz*, JC and I are heading out on a six day bus tour of Southern Ireland. Even though we have always preferred to plan our own itineraries, having to drive on the “wrong side” of the road convinced us that there’s a first time for everything.

After much research, we settle on Paddywagon Tours. With high ratings, moderate pricing and small groups, we like the fact that they attract a younger demographic. We’re on our own for dinner each night (breakfast is included), leaving us some freedom of choice. While accommodations are simple, staying at bed-and-breakfast inns gives us the chance to get acquainted with the locals.

The jolly group from all over the world starts to assemble and introductions are made; three groups of women celebrating their 40th birthdays, a young man in his late 20s who just moved to Ireland, two recent college graduates with their parents, couples in their 50s and small world; two women from Austin, Texas.

Everyone (especially the birthday girls) likes our driver, Barry, immediately. He is a tall, good looking guy in his late 30s and has a nice way about him, speaking just enough to enlighten us about his country, but also knowing when some quiet time is needed. As we drive out of Dublin, he mentions that the locals call the Obelisk near the River Liffey the “Stiffy on the Liffey.” Having warmed up the crowd, he asks if we know the difference between Scotts and the Irish; Scotts are Irish people that can’t swim and then mentions that he’s half Scottish and half Irish; he likes to drink, but doesn’t like to pay for it.

Photo Glendolough
So much to explore at Glendalough

We drive through the rolling countryside to the Wicklow Mountains and hike around the monastery ruins at Glendalough, Valley of the Two Lakes. It takes us a moment to realize that those are real reindeer just a few feet away and not animatronics. With only 34 of us on the bus, we are able to make quick on/off stops along the way and the first one is Hollywood (population 50). We learn that the iconic Hollywood sign actually originated here, when two brothers bought land in California and named it after their hometown. The medieval city of Kilkenny captivates us with its cobblestone streets and buildings that date back to the 12thcentury. We hang on every word, as our docent regales us with tales of the Butler family, proprietors of Kilkenny Castle.

Finally arriving in Waterford, Ireland’s oldest city, we dine at La Boheme. The husband and wife owners lovingly restored the arched ceilings, pewter bar and original flooring into a French restaurant full of old-world charm. We’re not sure if we preferred the duck breast with ginger and honey sauce or the rack of lamb, but we can agree that Day One on the bus with Barry and our new friends went quite well.

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!

 

Edinburgh, Scotland: September 2019

Photo Ediburgh

Edinburgh Castle looms over the city

It’s love at first sight! If Edinburgh were a shoe, it would be a Manolo Blahnik jeweled pump. This beautiful city, built on seven hills, looks like a movie set, with its cobblestone streets and its charming stone buildings, each vying for attention with flowering plants cascading from their window boxes.

There’s a certain feeling of comfort that English is the spoken language here, even though that Scottish brogue sometimes makes you need to pay a wee bit more attention. We’re told that it’s a short walk from the train station to the hotel and we take in all the sights and sounds, remembering to look right, left, up and down as we cross each street. It’s still unsettling to us that cars are driving on the opposite side of the road; each taxi encounter is more like a rollercoaster ride.

Stepping into our hotel, Tigerlily, takes our breath away. I’m here for only two minutes and I already know that we will add it to our list of all-time favorites. The small lobby gives way to two bar/sitting areas that have “Alice in Wonderland” written all over them.

Photo Edinburgh Tigerlilly 2

 

 

Photo Edinburgh Tigerlilly 1

 

The stylishly, large guest rooms, attention to detail (glitter balls hanging in the stairwells?!) and all-around trendiness is intoxicating; now I understand what the true definition of bling really is.

Day One
We hear bagpipes playing in the distance, so how can we not have a cocktail at a place called Angels with Bagpipes? We sit outside the 17th century building located on the Royal Mile, a main thorofare, and people watch (note: kilts on men are very sexy). Big A* and I compare research and settle on dinner at L’ Escargot Blanc. A winner of many awards, but unpretentious, it advertises itself as “the best of Scotland with a French twist.” Known for its casserole entrees, brightly colored casserole dishes of all shapes and sizes playfully adorn shelves as pieces of art. I am so impressed with the crockery canister of cornichons and wood tongs served with my terrine appetizer that I eat way too many, but save room for the luscious lamb entree. There’s no way we can bypass our jazzy hotel bars and not stop in one for a nightcap; a scenario that will play out each night of our stay.

Day Two
We’re not surprised that the Tigerlily breakfast is so exceptional. As I sip the best tea that I’ve ever tasted, I take note of how I can make sure to try as many of the offerings as possible. Fortified, we head to Edinburgh Castle for our tour (tickets purchased ahead online). A historic military fortress, royal residence and prison, it looms over the city. Our tour guide passes out his business card and introduces himself as “Australian David” (the better to identify him on TripAdvisor with). Dressed in a kilt, his acting background comes in handy as he regales us with countless tales of intrigue, warfare and romance.

We enjoy a quick lunch at Oink. A small space with a few seats, we line up to choose our size of pulled pork sandwich, type of bread, stuffing and sauce. Our next stop is Leith, a historic port town, and I will not let the rain dampen my excitement to visit the Royal Yacht Britannia. It is said that the day it was decommissioned, Queen Elizabeth II (not known for her emotions) actually shed a tear. As it turns out, it’s not all that difficult to be a Royal; all you need is a yacht and the handshake, which I practice on every level of the ship.

Our rain hoods affect our peripheral vision, but not enough that we don’t see into the bar at The Kitchin and decide that cocktails are in order. Contemporary and sleek, we dry off to the sound of Ella Fitzgerald. Then, it’s back to Edinburgh and on to Michael Neave Kitchen for dinner. The décor is a contemporary mix of metal and wood and, Neave, one of Scotland’s top young chefs, introduces us to cod with chorizo risotto and venison and lamb, both with a slightly gamey flavor, alluding to the fact that it’s been sourced from local farms.

Day Three
The rain is relentless, so JC* and I decide to explore the art at the National Gallery of Scotland (free!), rather than accompany Mr. Wiz* and Big A* on their day trip to St. Andrews, known as “the home of golf.” Bypassing the bar where Prince William and Duchess Kate met (they both attended St. Andrew’s University), they head straight for St. Andrew’s Links. They find out that it is a public golf course and on non event days, anyone can stroll around it. As luck would have it, they spend the afternoon watching Rory Mcllroy and his dad play golf together. They are told that tomorrow will start a championship open, so entry will be restricted and ticket prices will be high.

JC, Google Maps and I make it to our meeting place, The Royal Oak. As we’re all sharing our day’s adventures, we notice three people from very different walks of life enter, pull out their instruments and just start playing. The bar is so small that our knees are almost touching the band members’ knees, so we try to not make any sudden movements and realize we can’t leave until their set is finished. We then head down a narrow alley way and multiple stone steps to The Devil’s Advocate for dinner. It’s housed in an old Victorian pump house and is lit by candlelight. We’re very adventurous and find that even animal innards (haggis and black pudding) and lamb neck filets pair well with pinot noir.

I’m sorry to say goodbye to Edinburgh and my dream of living at Tigerlilly, but there’s still one more nightcap and one more breakfast to look forward to before heading on to Dublin.

 

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!

 

Glasgow, Scotland: September 2019

Photo Glasgow 1

Glasgow University

Glasgow is Gaelic for dear, green place. I open the plane shade as we are about to land and gasp. The craggy mountains are a splendid backdrop for the verdant patches that sparkle. JC* and I take one look at each other, smile, break into song with a quiet rendition of “Loch Lomond,” that old Scottish ballad, and receive a thumbs-up from Mr. Wiz*, while the family across the aisle claps softly:

“You take the high road
And I’ll take the low road
And I’ll be in Scotland before you
For me and my true love will never meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond”

We head to our hotel, excited to meet up with Big A*. The Fodors review was so complimentary that before booking the Carlton George, I checked to make sure that the reviewer’s last name wasn’t Carlton or George. All in all, it was a nice hotel in a great location, nothing exceptional. Due to the recent liquor issues in hotels, the complimentary decanters of gin, sherry and whiskey in our rooms go unopened, but the rooftop bar is a nice touch.

If Glasgow were a shoe, it would be a practical oxford in a daring color. What the city lacks in beauty, it makes up for with its edgy vibe. And then, there’s that sense of humor: someone has placed traffic cones on the heads of the elegant statues all around the city, a sign reads “There are two seasons in Scotland: June and Winter” and a Kentucky Fried Chicken ad asks “What the cluck?” I’m still giggling when we walk through a tunnel and painted on the wall it says “Are ye dancing?” and we pass Sweaty Betty, a women’s fitness apparel shop.

We explore Argyll Street, City Center, the West End and Glasgow Cathedral. Glasgow University enchants us; it’s very Hogwarts-like and we search for Harry Potter around every corner. We arrive just in time for an organ recital at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum and then learn about some of Scotland’s famous artists in a special exhibit.

We’re treated to a lovely view of the city at Citation, as we enjoy cocktails on its outdoor balcony. Even though we’re lucky to get the last table in the cobblestone courtyard at Sloan’s, a bar dating back to 1799, I make sure to check out its acid etched windows and mahogany staircase inside. We were so glad the hotel staff told us to check out the bar next door. We’d never seen anything like Waxy O’ Connors Pub. The waiter tells us that its design was the creation of the owner. We can’t imagine how he thought to combine six bars, multiple landings and nook and crannies over three floors in a gothic style that resembles a church and how the wait staff finds their way back to their customers.

Each morning at breakfast, we settle on our lunch choices. Catch wins us over with its luscious fish and chips and its navy and white nautical décor. Paesano impresses us by elevating pizza into an art form, its menu detailing how each imported ingredient was chosen and enlightening us about its wood fire oven, perfected over four generations.

Our culinary priorities set, by lunch time, we secure our dinner reservations, not wanting to miss out on any of the choices we’ve spent time researching. After dining at the Mussel Inn, we agree that, though delicious, we may have reached our mussel quota for the balance of the trip. Rogano’s elegant art deco décor sets the stage for their smoked fish chowder and lemon sole drenched in a brown butter sauce that I could have bathed in. The waiter tells us that we’re in good company (Henry Kissinger, Bob Dylan and Rod Stewart have also dined at table 16) and he will be sure to add the Thornton family to the list.

Now it’s on to Edinburgh! We head to the train, secure in the knowledge that we’ve successfully made the best of our short stay.

Photo Glasgow 2

*Who’s who? See “Cast of Characters” on the “About” page.

Author’s Note:
I would greatly appreciate your input; if you enjoyed this post, please scroll down and like it!